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Season 4, Episode 4 · 6 months ago

Episode 404 - Lady In White

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ghost story or infamous legend, what’s the difference? If you’re from the greater Rochester area, there’s a good chance you have heard one of the many tales regarding the lady in white apparition that haunts Durand Eastman Park. Why do these stories persist through time? What do morphologies of urban legends suggest about the societies that engrain them? Find out how this seemingly innocent local fable intertwines with darker hidden histories and more within The Lady in White, an episode produced, researched, and engineered by Jacob Hall, Wesley Mawn, and Divya Duraisamy.

My name is Devio, I'm Wesley and I'm Jacob, and this is here. You are, Rochester, retold two hundred years of hidden history. Episode four, lady and White. In the dark of a cold night in the eighteen hundreds, a young girl left her home by Durant Eastman Beach, just on the outskirts of Rochester. She put on her jacket, tied her shoes and trecked off along the beach of Lake Ontario. She was never seen again. For years, the lady in white searched along the paths of Durant Eastman Park, but she was never able to find her daughter. To This Day, her story has been passed along, as her ghost is still seen searching the park in the afterlife. When she's seen in the woods, she what? That's not how the story goes. What do you mean it's The lady in White? I've heard the story thousands of times. Well, that's not how I heard the story. What do you mean? The daughter was never found? Let me go here you are, Rochester, New York, the origin of the infamous ghost tail of the lady in White. In the dark of a cold night in the eighteen hundreds, a young girl left her home by Durrand Eastman Beach, just on the outskirts of Rochester. She put on her jacket, tied her shoes and trecked off along the beach of Lake Ontario. As the sunrise glistened across the lake. The next morning a mother awoke to an unusual silence in the house, having not seen her daughter since the night before. The mother immediately contacted the police, put on her infamously chilling white dress and went out with her dogs to search for her daughter. After days of searching, her daughter's body was found, having been raped and murdered in the woods by the beach. Heartbroken and enraged by her daughter's death, the lady and white continue to search for the killer. For years, the lady and white searched but never found the one responsible. Defeated and on the...

...brink of insanity from years of searching, the lady and white jumped off a cliff by the beach into the afterlife, where her ghost is still seen looking for the killer. Today, her vengeful soul is known to kill beach goers and then wait, wait, wait, that one's more similar to the one I heard. While you're missing some pretty big pieces of the story before the lady and White's daughter went missing. This is what I heard on a ghost to her once. The lady in White, who supposed name was Eliza, came from a rough background and her parents married her off to a local farmer. However, soon after the marriage, her husband started getting violent. Once Eliza was pregnant, she quickly realized she could not raise a child ast man, horrified that he would hurt her daughter over time, these fears became too much for Eliza and no other way out, she murdered her husband inside what is now known as Durand Eastman Park. Her fear of men, however, never seemed to go away. Sixteen years later, when her daughter introduced her to the man she was planning to marry, Eliza was seized by fear and then rage. She threatened the man to never return. Furious with her mother, Eliza's daughter chose to leave. Grabbing her bags, she ran away into the night to rendezvous with her fiance at the nearest stagecoach stop. Now have enough money for the both of them. Her fiance bit her farewell and sent her off to an end in the city of Rochester, but plans of meeting her the next day. Walking back through the cold, dimly lit forest, he stumbled upon a wandering Eliza and a white dress, two dogs by her side. Eliza, not noticing her daughter, assumed he must have done something horrible to her. Quick to act, or at least her two hounds on the man, severely injuring him. As he held on to the last bit of life left, Eliza dragged him into a quick sandpit to finish him off...

...field by vengeance and sorrow. The lady in White would searched to ran Easton Park, day in and day out in hopes of locating her daughter. After months of searching to no avail, the lady in White decided to take her and her two dogs on a short cut for a frozen lake. The ice was not sturdy enough and engulf the lady in light and her two dogs. She continued the search for her dog her through the afterlife, killing any man that she encountered along her search. Well, why are these stories so different? Do you actually believe in the lady in wait? I mean, the story has been around for decades and there are so many avid believers around Rochester. Yeah, I've heard about the story hundreds of times, but most of the story has become debunked. The details of the lady in white usually depend on the storyteller. Here's Jason Milton, a Rochester native who is a producer of ghost stories, a web series looking in into the supernatural. I think I've heard like probably like seven different ones and different variations on like what the story is, why it's happening, who it is all that stuff. So it's like it very much is. I think it's like constantly morphing, like every time someone tells the story they kind of add a little bit to it or change something and eventually that kind of makes it into the the whole bigger picture of it. It's clear that this story is still prevalent, especially amongst older Rochesterians who are in school during its height round the S. although the legend has inspired campfire storytellers, ghost tours and a fear of the woods neighboring drand Eastman Beach, there has never been any proof that the lady in wait actually existed. Jenny Lynn, a local who gives guided ghost tours about the lady and White, had a lot to say about the story. You know, I always hear from Rochester youth that Rochester just isn't that interesting of a place and I think there is that desire to have something special here and I...

...think for a lot of people that is the White Ladies Castle. I know for me this has been a big part of my life since I was a little kid. I was fascinated by the story, fascinated by the architecture of the castle and I think just wanting something important and interesting here and to be a part of that. I know I feel that way. The lady in White Spooky Stone Castle was allegedly on the outskirts of Duran Eastman beach. Today, the castle's remaining stone walls stand damaged from years of graffiti, trespassing and even arson. The remains of her alleged castle are actually the remains of an old concession area for predepression tourists, never once being a place of residence. There's also no record of a death or disappearance that lines up with the daughter of the lady in White, and no name has been found for this family allegedly living in the castle by the beach. Here again is Jenny Lynn from the ghost tour it was probably around the turn of the century, one thousand nine hundred. That's probably when the story sort of picked up and started really getting into the public because people were flocking here. The middle class suddenly had wealth they could enjoy a vacation. In response to the rapid economic boom in Rochester and expansion of businesses, there was a large middle class that could afford to frequently camp at and spend time at Duran Eastman Park. Attractions grew along the shores of Lake Ontario. This brought more tourists to the area, driving the need for the concession stand, which is now confused as the lady in White's castle. While there's evidence of this story existing in the early nineteen hundreds, it didn't really seem to take off beyond border mouth or end up in Rochester newspapers until the eight S, where its popularity seemed to have peaked. Since then there have been new sightings and revivals of the legend throughout every generation. Many people attribute the spike and popularity to the nineteen eighty eight murder thriller the lady in White, produced by a Rochester local, Frank Leloja. Girl...

...you was killed in the clover, a girl who wants you to find her. chiller where you help me. You have just one hope to solve the mystery, to save your life a lady in White. While the plot is loosely based on the original legend, it continue the fear of that figure through the late eighties, into the nineties and beyond. More recently, her legend came back into the media after a big storm hit the area in twenty seventeen. During the storm, a lightning bolt struck a tree into randy'smin Park. Out of the singed wood was a silhouette of the lady and white reaching out of the tree. This reinvigorated the story for a younger generation. Since the legend's origin, the ghost of the lady in White is said to attack young men when she spots couples on her search, hoping to protect young women from the same fate as her. Do Better. Each version has unique perspective, but there's more than what meets the eye for the seemingly innocent ghost story, and this can reveal patterns of local thought throughout time. It's widely known that there's no proof behind the story, yet it's still stuck around, chiefly spread by word of mouth. The story is worked by people's individual fears and twists. But how exactly has the chilling legend of the lady and white been kept alive for so many years? While the lady in white of Duran Eastman Park is popular, in Rochester, apparitions of a vengeful female spirit and white are usually common. Any yella Yaffees book apparitions and precognition dives into the common figure of a woman in white throughout folklore and urban legends. The apparitions of this type are common amongst many locations and cultures, but display some of the same characteristics between their different versions of the story. In every iteration, the white lady is usually seen more than once, is connected to some sort of location or castle and lures innocent people into an encounter with the apparition. Yafee also...

...says that a reaction to these spirits are different in the eye of the beholder. Young girls typically see white lady apparitions as friendly, while young boys are usually much more scared of these encounters. Rochester's lady in White fulfills all of these expectations. Ghost stories are born out of a sense of fear fueled by youthful imagination, like a monster under the back, a vampire in the night or an evil clown and the sewer. Humans get exhilaration from being scared. Just because our society feels safe. There's always a fear of the unknown and as May even increase as we become more comfortable in today's modernizing world. Our Sea Finnicans Book Ghosts, Appearance Of The dead and Cultural Transformations highlights the impact that's supposed apparitions, scary stories or supernatural activity can have on people, as well as how people's fears and life are usually imprinted onto them. He explains that in the twenty century, many people wanted to believe in ghosts throughout the catastrophic loss of life that came with the World Wars, fathers and sons lost in battle or yearned for by their living families hoping they'd be able to see them again. Even today, people frequently seek out mediums to speak with the dead, and ghosts are common in movies and pop culture, whether it be positive visitation to grieving families or vengeful demon in a horror movie. Ghosts are seen frequently in media today. The basis of tales like the lady in White are urban legends, and this is nothing new. Bloody Mary, slender men and other common characters brewed out of imagination are kept alive through questionable sightings. They then get passed down through generations and can highlight how people make sense of their world and fears, and have only gained potential to spread and stick around...

...with the rise of social media. Stories like these start with fear. We latch onto this and spread it with other people given the same terror and rush. The constant retelling leads to the shuffling of details like a long telephone game that have led us today's different versions of the lad in white and Rochester, our lad in white has nestled into pop culture today, but the horror trope of a creepy lady in white exists far outside of our local version. They are lady in white stories that has sparked out of many other parts the United States and even abroad and countries such as Taiwan. Some revolve a on the same general idea as ours, while other versions outside of Rochester had different messages. Even one center around safe driving. Near the start of this legend, the lady in White was painted as a vengeful soul still looking for her daughter, but when it resurfaced in the S, shifted to a way to scare youth into behaving. The main implication of this version was to push boys to be more respectful and for girls to not be promiscuous, and this was truly a sign of the Times. Something as simple as a ghost story can say a lot about people's way of thinking during the time they circulate. This principle aligns with the lady and wit's prevalence in Rochester throughout the s. At this time, Rochester locals were familiar with disappearance murder, and we're experiencing real who in their community. Between Seventy one to nineteen seventy three, three young girls were murdered in Rochester, Carmen Cologne, Wanda Welco wicks and Michelle Manza. Because each of the victims had double initials. The killer was named the alphabet killer but still, to this day, has never been identified. It was also around this time, in nineteen seventy two, that the infamous Rochester Mobster Salvatorch and Jello was killed by an unknown hit man with a car bomb. The mob presence in Rochester was well known and another source of violence and fear during this time. Another murderer was Arthur Shaw Cross, better known as the genesee river killer. He went to prison in nineteen seventy two for killing two...

...young children. Upon his release in nineteen eighty eight, he went on a killing spree, driving around looking for sex workers and killing eleven by the time he was caught in nineteen ninety. These very real terrors undoubtedly affected the livelihood of Rochesterians and when there's so much real killing around you, it makes sense why people would latch onto a scary ghost story. The story even shows similar motives as the genesee river killers, targeting of sex workers at the end of the S. by this time, eighty percent of women were using birth control. Fashion quickly moved to more flashy outfits and people, particularly women, started becoming much more in tune with having freedom in their body and choices. This makes sense as to why a ghost looking for her lost daughter could have been spun into something to scare them. Straight teenagers were imprinted with the fear that if they went on any sort of date or romantic excursion by the beach or the woods, they would be at the mercy of the lady in White. Well, we all love a good ghost story. Understanding why we latch onto these and how public opinion influences. Each iteration can show us a lot about people throughout history. Here you are is a podcast created by the students at the University of Rochester. Our episode featured Jacob Haul as our producer, Wesley Man as a lead researcher and Divia Dursami as a sound engineer, with all three serving as narrators. The music on this episode was from Blue Dot sessions and the sound effects from freesound dot org. We'd also like to thank Jenny Lynn and Jason Milton for their interviews. Be sure to check out the ghost tours and Jason Milton's showing Youtube Ghost stories. Here you are is created using faders, a collaborative online audio production workstation. It offers browser based audio recording and editing, all with an easy to use interface, all for free. Go check it out at FADER'S DOT IO. The coordinating producer for this season...

...of here you are Celia Conno. The executive producers are Thomas Fleishman and Stephen Russeler, and be sure to check out the other episodes of here you are season for Rochester retooled he here you arecom.

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